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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
edmonds is building a whole new community for people like margot brown. soon his efforts will transform this farmland into corporate office parks, a golf course and 4,600 new homes. this is, indeed, an edge city. as you look at suburbanization of america and following transportation corridors, both north and south-- whatever the geographic area happens to be-- it is, uh, an example of that. people here are commuting within the 25-to-30-mile radius. um, u're not going to see too much migration into the city, but they are currently working with about a 25-mile radii, and they're looking for value and looking for, uh, lifestyle. the development is really creating a whole, new town. uh, we will have up to 5,000 residential units, rohly 400 acres of commercial office areas. we have various retail components, golf courses, school sites. so you're going to see all the elements that you would see in most hometowns. uh, they will all be in one development. narrator: one development-- building over 2,600 acres of prime farmland. pihl: sobo is feousureon farrs lih xioumounuys growth , phys lesle p
effort spanning more than ten years. director j. carter brown worked closely with architect i. m. pei in its development. seven works of art were commissioned it was agreed that a specific piece was needed to animate the unbroken expanse of wall in the central courtyard. but the artist would have to have a capacity for monumental concepts, with a sense of color and scale appropriate to the site. a unanimous choice was spanish artist joan miro. born in the catalan city of barcelona in 1893, miro has remained close to the land and its people. but as a young man in paris, he joined th friends like max ernst and jean arp in the emerging surrealist movement of the 1920s. in his painting "the farm," miro's characteristic symbols and themes began to appear: serpentine shapes, checkerboard patterns, infinite space represented by the moon or a star. in 1922, he painted "the farmer's wife," the ancestress of countless female symbols that also became a continuing motif in miro's art. in 1924, his art broke free of gravitational constrats in the surrealistic world of "harlequin's carnival." over
, those drms and efforts are reaching a successful conclusion. "femme" is at home. brown: "it's everything we hoped." today, suspended 42 feet above the museum floor, "femme" is fulfilling her intended role. she stands tall, as the 76-foot mobile by miro's close friend alexander calder slowly circles by. she is in the company of the works of other modern masters such as henry moore and jean arp, of david smith, noguchi, caro, rosati and motherwell. but she stands alone at the head of the south wall as a unifying force and vital core of color in the east building of the national gallery of art. ( music ) ( music ) narrator: thomas moran embarked on his first trip to the west in 1871. the united states at the time was still recovering from the ravages of the civil war. americans turned with hope to the western frontier. by painting the pristine grandeur of these remote places, moran enabled 19th-century americans to visualize a magnificent landscape most would never see. his paintings transformed their perceptions of the west. from 1867 to 1879, the united states government sponsored four we
about what robert brown did back in 1830. he's looking in a microscope. and in the microscope, he sees little things jiggling. and at first he thought it was something in there alive, those little particles of soot and these little things are jiggling, jiggling, jiggling, and brown thought that maybe he saw atoms, but they weren't atoms. guess what they were, gang. little specks of dust banged into by, guess what. atoms. it's like this. see this styrofoam cup? you guys can all see this. see this little bb right here, little bb in my hand. i got a whole bunch up in there, see them, i spill them on the table. see those little bbs, you guys can't see those bbs, 'cause you're too far away from them, okay? but can you picture this? can you picture the styrofoam cup on the table and all these bbs, all moving around haphazardly, chaotically and every once in a while the bbs and more bbs hit one side of the cup than the other, what will the cup do? wouldn't the cup start to jiggle? and you guys can see the cup, but you can't see what's making the cup jiggle. you know there's something smaller
that is mostly dry and brown, is mbut as you movsouthica's, thtoigher latitudes, the green color of this thatsatellite photomosaicown, reveals an ecological zone with great potential for market-motivated exports. along chile's coast, south of santiago, are thsmall mountains knowas the coastalange. this region is the center of chile's booming forest products sector. the st common treeere now is the radiata, or monterey pine, imported from california 30 years ago. unr the right condns, radia pines the fastt growg trs the world, because unlike other trees, they continue to grow all year round. they like it damp, and they won't grow where it is too hot or too cold. that leaves out most places. but with much ideal habitat, chile's south-central coast is now world's by 2000, chile harvested moreha mon cuc mersf afocotrun for od pulp to mceulose. jan an. demand contiesin the 21, despite japan's economic stagnation and the asian crisis of the late '90s. fish, too, are an important primary product. whether netted in the pacific or raised on commercial farms, th u. anasian consumers. but
. where? show me again. where? i see green and red. you see green and red? me, too. do you see brown? no. hendrick: of course, no matter which techniques you decide to use, inevitably you will encounter some parents or family members who think you aren't doing enough fast enough, who want to accelerate the pace of their child's cognitive learning. woman: oh, let's see. let's see. that sounds exciting. oh. [child speaks indistinctly] oh, there's a little ant right there. there's a whole bunch of them. i wonder if they're going home to their family? be gentle. gentle. be gentle. that's right. they're going up. they're going up the tree. they're scared. wow. you think they're scared? what's scaring them, cosmo? i'm scaring them. oh, you scared them? how could you make them so they're not scared? hendrick: it's very important to keep the families informed about all the thinking skills the children are using in order to reassure them the children are really learning something. woman: i see one right here. find another one. woman: so if we made a bigger cage, we'd have to make something with c
in and of itself. if you want to go black and chocolate brown, you can do that as well. the stones can have a bit more of a great cast to it. it is ankle length. light but there is a raw edge. there a lot of diagonal lines on this for you as well. this is why at this price, i am surprised this skirt is still here today. the quality of washable swayed has been superb of late. i just found out when i was in new york last week. by what you can especially aware you're getting a discount. this is machine washable. you worry about going to eat with it. or you have the perseverance against it. now remember that this style in a skirt has been around forever. this is an absolute classic. he will be thrilled that you pick this up. the link on this in washable swayed is phenomenal. this is the only tranche in my entire collection that is 51 in.. that is a really big deal. remember: suede and leather can be tailored. typically, a trench coat is double breasted. we did a simple front closure for you. if i give you a generous sweep, that would be a problem. i know exactly where you're talking about. there're s
informed about these mushroom-based products. >> keep them in the brown paper bag in the refrigerator, not in the crisper, and you have no problems with them. >> ok. >> these are the gray morels. and i usually love the flavor on them. >> these are what kind? >> gray morel. >> oh. >> you know, generally, you want something, when you pick it up, it doesn't feel like it's gonna crumble in your hand. >> mm-hmm. >> and all these are really good. i would say this guy is starting to turn a little bit. >> ok, so not this one. >> yeah. so, you can kind of feel it's moist. it's starting to crumble. these are sea beans. >> what are these? >> [chuakles] they're also known as pickleweed, salicornias, uh, samphire, pousse-pierre, a lot of--they're found in a lot of different areas throughout the world. >> just eat it? >> just bite right into it. it's like a little bite of the seed. >> salty. mm-hmm. >> mm-hmm. and they do grow in marshes. >> pure salt. that's good. instead of, like... >> instead of a pretzel with yo beer? >> yeah, or french fries... >> you can have a little of-- >> or chips. >> won
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)